Isothermal Community College

Learning Support and Retention

Meeting with your advisor

When to meet with your advisor?

The most common reason for meeting with an advisor is to prepare for registration each semester.

New Students - You will be assigned to an advisor after your application is complete and you have completed the placement tests (if necessary). You should then make an appointment with your advisor. If your first advising session is conducted by someone other than your assigned advisor, it is a good idea to meet your assigned advisor during the second or third week of your first semester. Just dropping by your advisor’s office for a brief introduction will help make you more comfortable when the time comes to be advised for your next semester of classes.

Returning Students - To have the best chance of getting into the classes you want, make an appointment with your advisor on the advising day that happens prior to the semester for which you wish to register. The dates for advising days are printed in the student handbook and usually happen in October and March. If you cannot meet on the designated advising days, you should make an appointment with your advisor as early as possible before the beginning of the semester. While drop-in advising is available during open registration periods, it is strongly recommended that you meet regularly with your assigned advisor to ensure consistency and accuracy in your advising experience.

Beyond preparing for registration, you should feel free to contact your advisor anytime you have questions about your academic plans and goals. While your advisor may not be immediately available, he or she will be glad to assist you as quickly as possible.

Preparing for a meeting with my advisor

There is a list of steps that should be followed before meeting with any advisor. These steps are in place to ensure that the time spent with your advisor is as efficient and effective as possible. In addition to these steps, your advisor may have other requests or requirements, and you should stay in touch with him or her to make sure you are adhering to their guidelines.

  1. Contact your advisor about three weeks before early registration to make an appointment. 
  2. Pick up the Class Schedule for your intended semester of registration. 
  3. Have a personal record of courses you have completed—an up-to-date checklist of courses you have already taken and passed (or are currently taking) for your program. 
  4. If you intend to transfer to another school, use the internet or call the school of interest and get their program requirements, and bring this information to your advising session.  
  5. Fill out a "tentative" schedule with a few extra required courses to be used as alternates, in case of course close-outs.  Make sure that your course selections do not conflict to the minute.  Be sure to include the three letter prefix, three digit course number, and three digit section number for each course. 
  6. Make sure your personal information (name, address, email address, home phone, cell phone, etc.) is up-to-date with the college and be prepared to make your advisor aware of any changes.     
  7. Show up for your appointment.

Finding your Advisor

You will be assigned to an advisor based on your program of study when your application is completed. You will receive a letter once your admissions file is complete informing you of your advisor and student ID number. You can contact your division if you need to find out who your advisor is.

Arts and Sciences - 828-395-1301
Applied Sciences - 828-395-1441
Business Sciences - 828-395-1670
Health Sciences - 828-395-1621

If you are not sure which department you fall under, you should contact Student Services at 828-395-4193.

Declaring a major - Getting an advisor

The first place to go on campus if you are having trouble making decisions about academic goals is Learning Support and Retention, and you can make an appointment with them by calling 828-395-1436. Also, you are welcome to talk with any of the faculty members on campus about their programs of study, and talking to them might give you ideas about what you can do with the various degrees offered on campus. Whatever you do, know that this is an extremely important decision that must be made very quickly, and consequently, it is a good idea to use as many resources as possible when trying to make your decision.